Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+)
Print    Email
Font Size Print Email
Bookmark and Share
left
right
cap_wrapper_header
cap_wrapper_left
Our Locations
Health Library
Body Guide
Care Guides
Health Risk Assessments
My Checkups
DecisionAssist
Thomson Drug Interaction Checker
Thomson Drug Notes
Wellness Tools
Health Centers
Health Library (En Espanol)
spacer

Health Library

Search Health Information   

24-hour urinary aldosterone excretion test

Definition:

The 24-hour urinary aldosterone excretion test measures the amount of aldosterone removed in the urine in a day.

Aldosterone can also be measured with a blood test .



Alternative Names:

Aldosterone - urine



How the test is performed:

A 24-hour urine sample is needed. You will need to collect your urine over 24 hours . Your health care provider will tell you how to do this. Follow instructions exactly. This ensures accurate results.



How to prepare for the test:

Your health care provider will ask you to stop for a short time medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about all the medicines you take. These include:

  • High blood pressure medicines
  • Heart medicines
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
  • Antacid and ulcer medicines
  • Water pills (diuretics)

Do not stop taking any medicine before talking to your doctor.

Be aware that other factors can affect aldosterone measurements, including:

  • Pregnancy
  • High- or low-sodium diet
  • Strenuous exercise
  • Stress

Do not drink coffee, tea, or cola during urine collection. Your health care provider will likely recommend that you eat no more than 3 grams of salt (sodium) per day for at least 2 weeks before the test.



How the test will feel:

The test involves only normal urination. There is no discomfort.



Why the test is performed:

The test is done to see how much aldosterone is released into your urine. Aldosterone is a hormone released by the adrenal gland that helps the kidney control salt and potassium balance.



Normal Values:

Results depend on:

  • How much sodium is in your diet
  • Whether your kidneys work properly
  • The condition being diagnosed

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.



What abnormal results mean:

A higher than normal level of aldosterone may be due to:

Lower than normal levels may indicate Addison disease .



What the risks are:

There are no risks with this test.



References:

Gruber HA, Farag AF. Evaluation of endocrine function. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry’s Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 22nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 24.




Review Date: 9/1/2013
Reviewed By: Brent Wisse, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com


Who We Are

Contact & Connect

Hospitals & Locations

Health Education & Tools

cap_wrapper_right
cap_wrapper_footer