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Osteomyelitis

Definition

Osteomyelitis is a bone infection caused by bacteria or other germs.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Bone infection is most often caused by bacteria, but it can also be caused by fungi or other germs.

  • Bacteria may spread to a bone from infected skin, muscles, or tendons next to the bone. This may occur under a skin sore.
  • The infection can also start in another part of the body and spread to the bone through the blood.
  • A bone infection can also start after bone surgery. This problem is more likely if the surgery is done after an injury or if metal rods or plates are placed in the bone.

In children, the long bones of the arms or legs are most often involved. In adults, the feet, spine bones (vertebrae), and hips (pelvis) are most commonly affected.

Risk factors are:

People who have had their spleen removed are also at higher risk for osteomyelitis.

Symptoms

Other symptoms that may occur with this disease:

Signs and tests

A physical exam shows bone tenderness and possibly swelling and redness.

Tests may include:

Treatment

The goal of treatment is to get rid of the infection and reduce damage to the bone and surrounding tissues.

Antibiotics are given to destroy the bacteria causing the infection.

  • You may receive more than one antibiotic at a time.
  • Often, the antibiotics are given through an IV (intravenously, meaning through a vein) rather than by mouth.
  • Antibiotics are taken for at least 4 - 6 weeks, often through an IV at home.

Surgery may be needed to remove dead bone tissue if you have an infection that does not go away.

  • If there are metal plates near the infection, they may need to be removed.
  • The open space left by the removed bone tissue may be filled with bone graft or packing material. Doing this promotes the growth of new bone tissue.

Infection that occurs after joint replacement may need surgery to remove the replaced joint and infected tissue around the area. A new prosthesis may be implanted in the same operation. More often, doctors wait until the infection has gone away.

If you have diabetes, it will need to be well controlled. If there are problems with blood supply to the infected area, such as the foot, surgery to improve blood flow may be needed to treat the infection.

Expectations (prognosis)

With treatment, the outcome for acute osteomyelitis is usually good.

The outlook is worse for those with long-term (chronic) osteomyelitis. Symptoms may come and go for years, even with surgery. Amputation may be needed, especially in those with diabetes or poor blood circulation.

The outlook for those with an infection of the prosthesis depends, in part, on:

  • The patient's health
  • The type of infection
  • Whether the infected prosthesis can be safely removed

Calling your health care provider

Call your health care provider if:

  • You develop symptoms of osteomyelitis
  • You have osteomyelitis and the symptoms continue despite treatment

References

Matteson EL, Osmon DR. Infections of bursae, joints, and bones. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 280.

Berbari BF, Steckelberg JM, Osmon Dr. Osteomyelitis. In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R, eds. Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2009:chap 103.


Review Date: 5/30/2012
Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; and Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Assistant in Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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